Distinguished Traveling Lecturers

Laurie Butler

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[web]

University of Chicago
Professor, Department of Chemistry and The James Franck Institute

Research Areas:
Our research investigates the fundamental inter- and intramolecular forces that drive the course of chemical reactions. To experimentally probe the detailed molecular dynamics, both nuclear and electronic, during a chemical reaction we use a combination of molecular beam reactive scattering and laser spectroscopic techniques. The studies test the predictions of emerging quantum theories and develop an intuitive framework for understanding chemical reaction dynamics in more complex organic and inorganic reactions.

Selected Career Highlights:
Fellow of the American Physical Society, Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation Teacher-Scholar, National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator. Served on advisory boards for the Journal of Chemical Physics and the Journal of Physical Chemistry. Research funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.

Hui Cao

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[web]

Yale University
Professor of Applied Physics and Physics

Research Areas:
Random Lasers, Mesoscopic Transport of Photons, Semiconductor Microcavity Lasers, Ultraviolet Photonic Crystals.

Selected Career Highlights:
Ph.D. Stanford University, 1997. Fellow of American Physical Society (2007), Fellow of Optical Society of America (2007), Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award from American Physical Society (2006), Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award from Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (2005), Outstanding Young Researcher Award from Overseas Chinese Physics Association (2004), National Science Foundation CAREER Award (2001), Alfred P. Sloan Fellow (2000), David and Lucile Packard Fellow (1999).

Fleming Crim

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[web]

University of Wisconsin
John E. Willard and Hilldale Professor of Chemistry

Research Areas:
Molecular reaction dynamics in gases and liquids using molecular beams, high resolution lasers, and ultrafast lasers. The control of chemical reactions using vibrational excitation.

Selected Career Highlights:
B.S. Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas (1969) and Ph.D. Cornell University (1974) . Centenary Lecturer and Silver Medal, Royal Society of Chemistry, London; Irving Langmuir Award in Chemical Physics, ACS; Member, National Academy of Sciences; Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Earl K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy, APS; Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching, University of Wisconsin, Fellow, American Physical Society.

Jim Kafka

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[web]

Spectra-Physics, a division of Newport
Advanced R & D Director

Research Areas:
Laser designing and engineering.

Selected Career Highlights:
B.S. and Ph.D. Institute of Optics at the University of Rochester in 1977 and 1983, respectively. Authored numerous journal articles, conference presentations and seminars, co-authored a book chapter on Ultrafast Nonlinear Optics and holds more than 35 patents. Principal designer on the Tsunami, the Opal and the Millennia X, which have won technology achievement awards. Served as the Ultrafast Phenomena topical editor for JOSA B, the chair of the Lasers Technical Group and the co-chair for CLEO. Fellow of the Optical Society of America.

Wayne Knox

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University of Rochester
Professor of Optics, Vision Science and Physics

Research Areas:
The research areas of significant interest to Professor Knox are Ultrafast Science and Technology, Vision Science, Biomedical Optics, Telecommunications and Optics Education.

Selected Career Highlights:
B.S. 1979 and Ph.D 1983, University of Rochester. Fellow of the Optical Society of America and American Physical Society. 1990 W.O. Baker Award for Initiatives in Research. Over 140 publications and 40 patents. Chaired international meetings such as Ultrafast Phenomena, CLEO, Ultrafast Electronics and Optoelectronics, OSA Annual, and Nonlinear Optics. Was Director of the Institute of Optics 2001 through 2011.

Chris Monroe

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[web]

University of Maryland
Bice Zorn Professor, Department of Physics

Research Areas:
Atom and Ion trapping; quantum computing; quantum measurement and decoherence.

Research Highlights:
Ph.D University of Colorado, Boulder in 1992. Work in his group centers on the use of trapped atomic ions, currently one of the most attractive candidates for a future quantum computer. In his group's laboratory, individual atomic ions are trapped in free space with electromagnetic fields and laser-cooled nearly to rest, involving advanced optical and radiofrequency techniques. Long-term goals include the development of complex quantum logic gate structures and large-scale quantum computers.

Luis Orozco

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[web]

University of Maryland
Professor, Department of Physics

Research Areas:
Quantum Optics and Francium Spectroscopy

Career & Research Highlights:
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1987. Quantum Optics studies the coherence and statistical properties of light and how they change as it interacts with atoms. His experimental work is in Quantum Optics and Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). Francium Spectroscopy probes the structure of the heaviest alkali metal atom using laser light.

Carlos Stroud

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[web]

University of Rochester
Professor, Department of Physics
Professor, Institute of Optics

Research Areas:
Quantum optics: quantum information theory, atomic physics, and nonlinear optics. Rydberg atomic electron wave packets; multilevel quantum logic; generation of quantum states of light via electromagnetically induced transparency; and entanglement and teleportation of macroscopic states of matter.

Selected Career Highlights:
A.B. degree in Physics and Mathematics from Centre College, Ph.D. in Physics from Washington University, 1969. He is currently Professor of Optics and Professor of Physics, and Director of the Center for Quantum Information, fellow of Optical Society of America and the American Physical Society, lectured in more than 75 different universities.

Ron Walsworth

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[web]

Harvard University
Senior Lecturer, Department of Physics
Senior Physicist, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

Research Areas:
Application of atomic physics techniques -- from astrophysics to nanoscience to biomedical imaging.

Selected Career Highlights:
B.S. in Physics, Duke University,1984, Ph.D. in Physics, Harvard University, 1991. Fellow of American Physical Society (2001). Francis Pipkin Award from American Physical Society (2005). Co-discoverer of the light storage technique using electromagnetically induced transparency. Development of astro-combs to aid discovery of Earth-like planets around other stars; precision spin measurements and magnetometry using Nitrogen Vacancy centers in diamond; precise tests of physical laws and symmetries using atomic clocks; and biomedical and materials science investigations using MRI of hyperpolarized noble gas and nanoparticles.

Linda Young

[e-mail]
[web]

Argonne National Laboratory
Distinguished Argonne Fellow, Chemistry Division
Group Leader - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics

Research Areas:
Ultrafast x-ray probes of atoms and molecules in strong-laser fields; strong-field control of x-ray processes; applications of x-ray free electron lasers.

Selected Career Highlights:
S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1976, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1991. Fellow American Physical Society, Associate Editor, Applied Physics Letters. The response of atoms and molecules to strong-laser fields is observed with ultrafast x-rays from accelerator-based facilities. This provides an atomic scale visualization of the motion of electrons and the response of the molecular framework to controlled laser fields. Applications include x-ray imaging of non-crystalline objects.

 
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